Our #1 Postpartum Nutrition Recommendation


Three reasons why I love bone broth, especially during the first 8 weeks postpartum: 


1. Full of minerals and gelatin and other healing properties.

2. Amino Acid building blocks- proline, glycine, and glutamine.

3. Helps heal and form healthy connective tissue (collagen).

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If you are in Los Angeles, then check out Smart Simple Gourmet, for ready-made chicken and beef broth. Linda attends some of the local farmers markets and has a store front around Culver City. If you are not in Los Angeles, then check out the recipe below from my dear friend Laura at My Radical Roots.

Simply Delicious Bone Broth Recipe by My Radical Roots

  • Servings: 4 mason jars
  • Time: 8-24 hours
  • Difficulty: super easy
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*There are a lot of variables here. Unlike baking, the ingredients and ingredient amounts don’t have to be exact. See, I told you this was an easy one.



  • 4 quarts of filtered water (I just fill my crockpot until about 1-2 inches from the top)
  • 1.5- 2 lb of bones from a properly raised animal of your choice (pastured chicken, grass-fed beef, etc.)**
  • cloves from 1 whole head of fresh garlic, peeled & smashed
  • 2 TB organic, unfiltered apple cider vinegar (I use Bragg’s)
  • 1tsp sea salt – or more/less to taste

OPTIONS: add chopped veggies or additional spices to your crockpot for the last 2 hours (I usually add carrots that have gotten a little floppy, along with oregano, thyme, and rosemary. BUT wait till the end so they don’t get bitter)

**when I make beef broth, I always like at least half my bones to be marrow bones because… marrow is amazing. For chicken, go for the bones with the most joints to get the most collagen. I stick with chicken feet and necks. It’s best when they have some meat on them too.



  • roast your bones at 300 degrees for 20 minutes or so (not necessary, but it adds some great flavor)
  • put all ingredients in a 6-quart crockpot and set the heat to HIGH.
  • bring the stock to a boil, then reduce the heat setting to LOW.
  • cook for a at least 8 hours (I usually go for 24 hours for more flavor and more nutrients)
  • check on it over time and make sure the liquid hasn’t reduced in volume as it heats and water evaporates (you may need to add water if that happens)
  • strain the stock through a fine mesh metal strainer and save the marrow (I put mine on a burger)
  • let your broth cool and strain off the top layer of fat that forms (you can keep this to use for cooking)
  • pour the cooled stock into glass jars for storage in the fridge (for up to a few days) it is also great to freeze and pull it out as needed!
  • if you nailed it, your broth will have a gelatinous consistency when it cools all the way (super gelatin-rich)

I use it in soups, chili, sauces, and to flavor any savory recipe that calls for (and in place of) water. We actually often just drink it with dinner. It’s delicious, calming, and I can just feel the nutrients doing their thing!